Many older workers would like to retire slowly, decreasing their hours at work before completely retiring. With the current economic downturn, people are expressing interest in working longer. People have a lot of their identity wrapped up in their careers, so reducing your hours can be a smoother transition both psychologically and financially. But is this option available to everyone? The Boston College Center for Retirement Research answered this question in a report titled Phased Retirement: Problems and Prospect.

Phased retirement is a white-collar phenomenon and high income individuals who are White, wealthy and educated are more likely to be able to reduce their hours with their employer. Interestingly, 73% of employers interviewed said they would ‘work out’ a phased retirement plan for certain managerial or higher level employees. These informal policies dominate over formal procedures with older workers being kept on to train colleagues or new staff. Unfortunately, not all workers are given the same options.

Employers point to a variety of constraints that make it difficult for them to provide phased retirement options. Pension plans or paying health insurance for older part-time workers is a frequently named drawback. Employers also express interest in only keeping certain employees. In fact, phased options are often offered to the best or favored employees allowing the employer to weed out undesirable workers. Still, one of the main reasons a company did not have phased retirement was simply because their business did not want or need part-time work.

The good news is that phased retirement options continue to increase among companies. If you are interested in phased retirement talk to your employer. Many different arrangements can be made to accommodate both the worker and the company. Here are some tips:

  • Double check – does your employer already have a phased retirement program in place?
  • Determine your needs – what do you want and what options are realistically available to you?
  • Pension impacts – does your plan provide for phased retirement? how could it impact your benefits?
  • Health insurance – what will happen to your health benefits if you reduce your hours?
  • When can I start – does your employer have policies that could affect your decision? (for example: 6 months after you retire you can come back and work part-time)
  • Employer expectations – what will be expected of you and how will your role and responsibilities change?
  • Find more information from the Wall Street Journal and AARP’s Public Policy Institute
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